Bushfire preparedness

Friends of North Bruny are hosting an event – Dennes Point Community Hall Saturday 1 August 10.30-12.30 – focusing on reducing fire risk, preparing properties for the fire season and seeking to better protect lives and property in the event of a bushfire.

Speakers include:

  • David Bowman – Professor of Pyrogeography & Fire Science, UTAS
  • Peter Middleton and Salina Young – Tasmanian Fire Service
  • Leigh Blackwell – our RFS Brigade Captain and
  • Belinda Loxley – Kingborough Council

             

Feral cat trapping season starting again

Federal funds will soon be released to continue the fantastic work on controlling the impacts of feral cats on Bruny.

Whilst the release of funding has been slow, that has not stopped Tonia Cochran and her team at Inala from continuing to trap feral cats, with four being caught in autumn 2020.

Late autumn through winter is the peak of the trapping season, and Conrad Daniels and his team at Bruny Farming can start working the highest impacted areas of the Neck and Cape Queen Elizabeth bird colonies.

They are also available to deal with feral cats elsewhere, so please contact Conrad on 0409 804 340 to seek help.

The new three year project will be coordinated through NRM South.  Kaylene Allan from Kingborough Council, who has steered this project for the last four years, will coordinate community engagement in the program and the management of domestic and stray cats.

Cyril Scomparin from the University of Tasmania is currently exploring how the different carnivores – the native eastern quoll and the introduced cat and black rat, interact, and what this may mean for cat control.

Multi-faceted and firmly based in science, this program leads the world in understanding how, and if, feral cat eradication on a large, populated island may proceed.

It is supported by a huge range of organizations, including the local businesses Pennicott Wilderness Journeys, Bruny Island Coastal retreats, and of course BIEN.

For further information see the Kingborough Council website.

 

Energy Forum Presentations

The forum held on March 14th was a very interesting and informative session. TasNetwork presenters Laura Jones and Michael Verrier elaborated on their prepared slides, that related sometimes quite technical details, in a manner that was accessible to every one present and clearly demonstrated their professionalism and expertise. Questions after each presentation afforded more clarification and quite a deal of general discussion around renewable energy and the payback time for battery storage, assured electricity supply via cable and in the case of disasters such as bushfire, by diesel generators.
The main takeaway messages from the forum were:
1. The Bruny Battery Trial was a success across several measures as has been previously related on this site .

2. The replacement cable for the one damaged by a boat anchor and which crosses from Tinderbox to Dennes Point will be approximately 3 times the capacity of the original. Amazingly the original cable has been in situ and operating since 1949.

3. There is still much analysis and research to undertake before the cable can be ordered and it is unlikely to be replaced before Feb 2021. Meanwhile additional diesel generators and remote switching upgrades will ensure supply in power outages or should a problem develop with the other cable.

4. The second cable to Woodcutter Point  is due for renewal in the next few years and TasNetworks are committed to consultation with the community in those decisions.

5. There is potential for renewable energy development projects and or community based electricity generation.

It was agreed to hold a further forum in 4 to 6 months time – COVID -19 circumstances allowing.

See the presentation slides here.

presentation

Bruny Energy Futures Forum

Public Forum at Adventure Bay Hall
Find out more about the Bruny Battery Trial results and implications.  Hear about plans for replacement of the damaged cross channel cable and future planning for Bruny electricity supply. Presentations will be followed by a Round Table Discussion.

TasNetworks presenters: Laura Jones –  Bruny Battery Trial
Michael Verrier, Asset Strategy Engineer – Cable replacement.

Climate ACT Now!

#ClimateActNow

Zali Steggall, Independent member for Warringah in NSW who unseated Tony Abbott will introduce the Climate Change bill into parliament. She answers questions here. Show support by signing a petition.

Why do we need the Climate Change Act?

The recent bushfires and the drought have shown that climate change is an immediate challenge to Australia. Many Australians feel that their way of life and future is now under threat. We urgently need plans to protect our communities and ensure our prosperity. The provisions within the Climate Change Act ensure there are equitable, transparent and science-based plans to address the impacts of climate change, prevent worsening consequences and take advantage of economic opportunities.

How will it work?

The proposed Climate Act will mandate:

  • A National Climate Risk Assessment
  • A National Adaptation Program
  • A Net-zero target by 2050 and;
  • Establish an independent Climate Change Commission

What is framework legislation?

Framework legislation is tried and proven legislation that has worked in overseas jurisdictions like the United Kingdom, France and Ireland. It has reduced emissions, helped those countries adapt to climate impacts, and advanced the climate change debate by taking the politics out of it. It works by setting a long-term pathway to net-zero emissions and helps guide decision-making to meet that target. It does this by requiring interim targets or emissions budgets which set a cap on economy-wide emissions.
By setting statutory targets, rather than just policy-based targets, it signals a greater level of commitment to emission reduction. Setting targets in legislation will also provide parliamentary scrutiny.
Framework legislation secures long-term policy and planning and ensures climate change action with changes of government. It does this by mandating the Government of the day develop and implement plans to meet those budgets and adapt to warming, which ensures that plans are not shelved and forgotten. All plans are made with overarching principles like intergenerational equity, transparency, fiscal responsibility and the best available science to ensure these plans are fair, equitable and consistent with best practice.

What will the Climate Change Act do?

The Climate Change Act will:

• Shore up Australia’s commitment to long-term climate action and reset the policy debate in Australia

• Make an immediate positive contribution to the world’s action on climate change and bolster our standing internationally

• Put Australia on a course towards a long-term goal of net-zero emissions by 2050

• Ensure action on climate change is equitable, transparent and leads to the best outcomes for all stakeholders

• Help protect Australians by ensuring there are plans to assess risks to all sectors, adapt to climate impacts and;

• Position Australia to take advantage of the opportunities that will come from climate action

Why a net zero by 2050 target?

Net-zero by 2050 is a science-based target consistent with the advice of climate science academia and the IPCC literature more broadly

• It is consistent with targets set in other developed countries around the world

• It would bring the Commonwealth into alignment with the Australian States and Territories the majority of which have net-zero targets in policy or legislation

• Built into the legislation are 5-yearly reviews which are consistent with the ‘pledge and review periods’ of the Paris Agreement and;

• The targets can be changed if there are significant developments in the science, international agreements and/or technology

Bruny Island Local Guide App now available!

The Bruny Island Local Guide provides comprehensive map-based information to visitors touring or staying on Bruny Island, Tasmania, Australia. There are also special features for locals. Currently, it is only available for Android-based smartphones.

Interactive maps show the locations of the main attractions, restaurants, historical sites and walking tracks. Photos and text explain the history and significance of all the main sites. Practical information about roads, toilets, petrol, weather and the ferry is also included together with emergency advice.

Whether you’re on the island for a day or a month this easy-to-use app will help you get the most from your Bruny Island visit.

Wildlife Conservation Field Day, April 2019

Over 50 Bruny Islanders participated in a Field Day at Apollo Bay to learn about how to protect and create wildlife habitat and monitor for feral cats and native wildlife. People got involved in the conversations and shared their own hard earned knowledge generously, helping to make the event a collaborative success.

Kingborough Council developed a summary from the day – download it here.

Other resources featured are the diagram below showing the different bird species foraging at different levels and the Tree Hollows booklet.  

To maintain healthy bird populations both in the home garden and the bush it is important to have structurally diverse vegetation with tall trees, smaller trees, understorey shrubs and grasses, herbs and litter.  These provide a variety of birds with foraging opportunities and places to nest, shelter and roost.

Adapted by Sarah Lloyd from Williams and Woinarski (1977). From Olsen, P., Weston, M., Tzaros, C., Silcocks, A. (2005) The State of Australia’s Birds 2005: Woodlands and Birds. Supplement to Wingspan, vol 15, no.4, December 2005

A: seed eaters e.g. Beautiful Firetail, Black Currawong

B: nectar feeders e.g. Eastern Spinebill, Crescent Honeyeater

C: hawkers e.g. Dusky Woodswallow, Welcome Swallow

D: small foliage gleaners e.g. pardalotes, Black-headed Honeyeater

E: large foliage gleaners e.g. Golden Whistler, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike

F: gleaners of prey from trunks and branches e.g. Grey Shrike-thrush, Yellow-throated Honeyeater, Strong-billed Honeyeater

G: flitter e.g. Superb Fairy-wren, Grey Fantail

H: pouncer e.g. Flame, Dusky, Scarlet and Pink Robins

I: Bird of prey e.g. Brown Falcon, Brown Goshawk

J: ground forager e.g. Bassian Thrush, Tasmanian Scrubwren