Wildlife Conservation Field Day, April 2019

Over 50 Bruny Islanders participated in a Field Day at Apollo Bay to learn about how to protect and create wildlife habitat and monitor for feral cats and native wildlife. People got involved in the conversations and shared their own hard earned knowledge generously, helping to make the event a collaborative success.

Kingborough Council developed a summary from the day – download it here.

Other resources featured are the diagram below showing the different bird species foraging at different levels and the Tree Hollows booklet.  

To maintain healthy bird populations both in the home garden and the bush it is important to have structurally diverse vegetation with tall trees, smaller trees, understorey shrubs and grasses, herbs and litter.  These provide a variety of birds with foraging opportunities and places to nest, shelter and roost.

Adapted by Sarah Lloyd from Williams and Woinarski (1977). From Olsen, P., Weston, M., Tzaros, C., Silcocks, A. (2005) The State of Australia’s Birds 2005: Woodlands and Birds. Supplement to Wingspan, vol 15, no.4, December 2005

A: seed eaters e.g. Beautiful Firetail, Black Currawong

B: nectar feeders e.g. Eastern Spinebill, Crescent Honeyeater

C: hawkers e.g. Dusky Woodswallow, Welcome Swallow

D: small foliage gleaners e.g. pardalotes, Black-headed Honeyeater

E: large foliage gleaners e.g. Golden Whistler, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike

F: gleaners of prey from trunks and branches e.g. Grey Shrike-thrush, Yellow-throated Honeyeater, Strong-billed Honeyeater

G: flitter e.g. Superb Fairy-wren, Grey Fantail

H: pouncer e.g. Flame, Dusky, Scarlet and Pink Robins

I: Bird of prey e.g. Brown Falcon, Brown Goshawk

J: ground forager e.g. Bassian Thrush, Tasmanian Scrubwren

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