Community trapping of stray cats

Assistance is being offered to Bruny Islanders to trap stray cats on private land.  By arrangement, traps can be borrowed and cats taken to the Cat Facility at Alonnah for assessment and care. We will particularly welcome help in our priority areas which include North Bruny and the Simpsons Bay, Alonnah and Adventure Bay areas.

For further information, or to loan traps please contact Kaylene Allan on 0439 885 803 or kallan@kingborough.tas.gov.au

If you are trapping feral cats in more remote areas then Conrad Daniels from Bruny Farming (ph 0409 804 340) can assist in their management.

Please remember that there is now a ban on the feeding of stray cats. This is an important part of the Bruny Island Cat By-law. Feeding stray cats can result in dense populations of unowned cats.  So if you see any stray cat, please get in touch and we can arrange to trap and assess them. This is the best way to protect their welfare and to manage their numbers and impact.

Feral cat trapping season starting again

Federal funds will soon be released to continue the fantastic work on controlling the impacts of feral cats on Bruny.

Whilst the release of funding has been slow, that has not stopped Tonia Cochran and her team at Inala from continuing to trap feral cats, with four being caught in autumn 2020.

Late autumn through winter is the peak of the trapping season, and Conrad Daniels and his team at Bruny Farming can start working the highest impacted areas of the Neck and Cape Queen Elizabeth bird colonies.

They are also available to deal with feral cats elsewhere, so please contact Conrad on 0409 804 340 to seek help.

The new three year project will be coordinated through NRM South.  Kaylene Allan from Kingborough Council, who has steered this project for the last four years, will coordinate community engagement in the program and the management of domestic and stray cats.

Cyril Scomparin from the University of Tasmania is currently exploring how the different carnivores – the native eastern quoll and the introduced cat and black rat, interact, and what this may mean for cat control.

Multi-faceted and firmly based in science, this program leads the world in understanding how, and if, feral cat eradication on a large, populated island may proceed.

It is supported by a huge range of organizations, including the local businesses Pennicott Wilderness Journeys, Bruny Island Coastal retreats, and of course BIEN.

For further information see the Kingborough Council website.

 

Cat management project update July 2019

Great progress continues with the cat management project, with cat numbers declining, new management approaches being trialed, Bruny Farming taking a major role, and support from the University of Tasmania and the Commonwealth Government continuing.

The report attached details cat occupancy and feeding habitats:

  • success in removing both feral and stray cats (122 cats all up!)
  • but evidence of rapid re-colonisation following removal
  • few cats north of Great Bay
  • many cats at the Neck and Whalebone shearwater and little penguin colonies
  • greatly increased activity at colonies during breeding season
  • widespread although low density of cats in the wetter forests of Southern Bruny
  • differences in the success of baits across the different habitats
  • limited success in removing ‘trap-shy’ cats
Distribution of 3.1kg female cat in and out of bird breeding season, Cape Queen Elizabeth

Communtiy engagement, particularly with current cat owners has been high, with Bruny Farming taking a lead role in this, and other activities. This enables a cooperative and harmonious approach, which in turn leads to success in reducing the impact of cats on Bruny’s wildlife.

Read the full report here..

Citation: Allan, K (2019) Bruny Island Cat Management Project update Feb – July 2019. Kingborough Council

Bruny Island Cat Management Project May 2018 Update

For the latest information about the various activities happening on Bruny Island in relation to feral and domestic cat management see the document here by Kaylene Allan, Cat Management Officer at Kingborough Council.


Topics covered in this update are:

  • Control of stray and feral cats
  • Management of domestic cats
    – Bruny Island Cat By-law to be introduced June 2019.
    – Bruny Island Aboriginal Community Ranger program
  • Monitoring and research
    – Surveys of Short-tailed Shearwaters, Little Penguins and Hooded Plovers
    – Investigating feral cats and other predators at the Neck
    – Tracking feral cats at the Neck Game Reserve and feral cat density and distribution on North Bruny
    – Investigating the diet of feral cats at the Neck
    – Cat management feasibility study
    – Future research.

The Bruny Island Cat Management Project is
generously supported by many partners

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside with Cats

Inside with Cats is a partnership between Kingborough Council, Ten Lives Cat Centre, Tasmanian Conservation Trust and the Bruny Island Environment Network.

This series of 5 videos  introduces six Kingborough cats (along with their humans), who are embracing life on the inside. Inside with Cats is not just about containing cats inside a house, it also explores the various options these owners have used for outdoor enclosures or walking harnesses, and how they keep their cats safe, happy and healthy.

To view the videos go to this link. https://www.kingborough.tas.gov.au/2018/03/inside-with-cats/

 

Design ideas for cat confinement

The article here highlights the many benefits of keeping your pet cat confined.  As  the author states

“Cats have contributed to the extinction of dozens of Australia’s native mammals and birds, and are listed as a key threat to many currently endangered animals. Due to these devastating effects, there have been calls for pet cats to be permanently confined to their owner’s property. Cat owners might be surprised to find that their smooch puss is a highly effective killer: according to research in Canberra that followed cats for 12 months, 70 per cent of cats were bringing home prey monthly, and 6 per cent of cats were bringing home prey weekly. And that’s only the prey they decided to share!”

So if you have a pet cat have a look at these great suggestions.

Purr-fect design – Sanctuary Magazine

Cat Management survey results

Responses from many (22 of 28) cat owners on Bruny Island confirmed the current approach in supporting owners to desex, microchip and contain their beloved moggies. Interestingly, the bulk of owners were already doing at least some of these things, but 4 households said they would not contain their animals.

Backyard playpen for cats.

 

These results align closely with research conducted elsewhere showing cat owners are critical to success in reducing the impact of cats on wildlife and that they need costs of participation reduced, and plenty of support to help them make the changes for their cats.  The full report is available here and makes interesting reading.

Of the 22 households surveyed, 19 own 1 or 2 cats, one has three cats and two households had more than 3 cats.  These 2 households reported that this was due to having undesexed cats and to their feeding of strays.

Despite most households have desexed (96%) and microchipped (86% ) cats , about a quarter of all cats were not desexed or microchipped due to the large number of cats in one household.

Providing financial subsidies was identified most frequently by respondents to encourage desexing and micro-chipping. This was followed by offering these services on the island.

Key recommendations arising from the survey were to:

  • continue individual one-on-one cat owner engagement to identify and address individual barriers and motivators;
  • enhance the established programs particularly to build cat owner capability and motivation, specifically:

1.  extend the advisory and design/building assistance to all individual households (with cats) requiring assistance.
2.  develop and distribute a cat containment guide. The guide will include containment options; environmental enrichment for a cat’s physical and emotional needs; addressing stressors in individual cats; and training principles to support transition.
3.  document and photograph new cat containment stories (& where appropriate video).
4.  print and distribute (to individual households on Bruny) additional stickers (developed by students on Bruny).
5. purchase 4 GPS cat trackers for use with the program.

  • continue to promote the By-law engagement program so that ideally all Bruny cat owners are engaged. Door-knock Bruny households (over summer) to discuss the By-laws and broader cat management on the island and ultimately engage more cat owners. Consideration will then be given to undertake a mail-out to all Bruny households and rate payers.